Tire Wear Indicator Bars | Best Car Blogs


What is a reasonable life expectancy for tires on a 2008 Nissan sentra/size P205/55r16

Your tires contain wear indicators built into the tread. Look for a bar molded into the bottom of the tread void, in the circumferential grooves. These bars are raised to 2/32nds of an inch. When your tread blocks wear to become level with these bars, they are completely worn out and need replacing. Coin Tread Depth Test: Quarter Test

Your tires may also have built-in tread wear indicators. They're little raised bars—usually six on each tire—along your tires grooves that mark the minimum permitted tread depth. If these indicators are worn, replace your tires right away. With a tire tread depth gauge. Tire tread depth gauges are a fast and easy way for you to know for

They can also appear in the sidewall. Fortunately, it's easy to do a visual check of sidewall problems. Look for tracks or cuts in the sidewall -- grooves that are distinct enough to be visible to the naked eye. This could be a sign that your tire is developing a leak (or worse, that it's nearly ready to blow out).

How To Measure Tire Tread Depth. You can also check the tread wear indicator. You can find the tread wear indicator less than an inch (2/32 of an inch) from the bottom of the tread groove. When the tread wears down to become even with this level, the tire should be replaced.

Using tires that still have enough tread is so important that tires are required to have tire wear bars-also called tire wear indicators or just wear bars-to make it easy for you to know if your tires need to be replaced just by looking at the tread. How Wear Bars Act as a Tread Wear Indicator. Tread depth is measured in 32nds of an inch.

Using tires that still have enough tread is so important that tires are required to have tire wear bars-also called tire wear indicators or just wear bars-to make it easy for you to know if your tires need to be replaced just by looking at the tread. How Wear Bars Act as a Tread Wear Indicator. Tread depth is measured in 32nds of an inch.